The Collective

Affrica Taylor

Affrica Taylor is an adjunct associate professor in Centre for Creative and Cultural Studies at University of Canberra. Her abiding interest in the entangled relations between people, places and other species was sparked while working as an educator in remote and urban Aboriginal communities in the 1980s and 90s, and consolidated by her doctoral research – a settler colonial geography of place and belonging. Her current work is situated within the feminist environmental humanities, experiments with collective (more-than-human) and creative modes of thinking and writing, and is geared towards redressing the entangled social and environmental legacies of colonisation and capitalist excess. It is motivated by a commitment to finding recuperative and convivial ways of co-inhabiting damaged common worlds in ecologically challenging times. She can be contacted at: affrica.taylor@canberra.edu.au

Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw

Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw is a professor in early childhood education at Western University. Her academic background in early childhood education and her current work as a pedagogista are combined with insights from feminist theory, environmental humanities, Indigenous studies, and cultural geography. Her interdisciplinary research with educators and young children explores the possibilities of common world pedagogies. It strives to engage children to pay close attention to place, to other species, and to how we all got to be in the space we share. She is interested in how we might learn with other species in the colonial spaces we co-inhabit. She can be contacted at: vpacinik@uwo.ca

Mindy Blaise

Mindy Blaise is a professor in early childhood education at Victoria University, Australia. Her background in the early years, interest in feminist theory, and experiences with ‘place' influence how she approaches research. Her interdisciplinary research with the more-than-human (objects, dogs, locusts, art, air, smell) uses multisensory practices to rework a humanist ontology. She is interested in how the more-than-human and experimental research practices set into motion meanings about childhood that sit outside of developmentalism. She can be contacted at: mindy.blaise@vu.edu.au

Michelle Elmitt

Michelle Elmitt has a background in paediatric physiotherapy, visual arts and creative writing. Her PhD research at the University of Canberra concerns love in reconfigured families. Her research examines the ways families formed through choice, rather than blood ties, function on an emotional level. This study probes the inner working of families to capture the voices and discourses at play in social kinship, which can be subject to oppression — partly invisible — by prevailing normative discourses. Examining how people are making loving relationships intelligible, when language does not always allow articulation, involves using more than verbal ways of decoding love. Haptic communication and material interactions are equally taken into account. Michelle can be contacted at michelle.elmitt@gmail.com

Kelly Boucher

Kelly Boucher is an Academic Teaching Scholar in the Bachelor of Early Childhood/Primary Education at Victoria University, Melbourne. She is an arts specialist with broad and varied experience teaching in both the arts and education sectors. Her research interests include: children as studio-based practitioners and co-collaborators in research; the role of materials in early childhood; sustainability and architecture and children as designers of place. In her own studio-based arts practice she engages with materials and processes typically used in early childhood settings to explore ideas about identity, belonging and place.

Kumara Ward

Kumara Ward is an academic at the University of Western Sydney teaching curriculum and Pedagogy in the Early Childhood Education program and a member of the Centre for Educational Research – Sustainability Strand. Her teaching, doctorial studies and current research focus on the symbiosis between the arts and the natural and built worlds and ways in which they promote embodied interaction and multifaceted ways of knowing our complex human and other than human common worlds. Expression of these worlds through the arts and the way in which artistic sensibilities lead us to shape our environment form an interdisciplinary synergy that enlivens curriculum content and contributes to the development of a shared existence that looks beyond sustainability. She can be contacted atk.ward@uws.edu.au

Fikile Nxumalo

Fikile Nxumalo is an assistant professor in the College of Education at the University of Texas at Austin, where she is also affiliated faculty with African and African Diaspora Studies, and Native American and Indigenous Studies. Fikile’s research and pedagogical interests are centered on environmental and place-attuned early childhood studies that are situated within and responsive to uneven anthropogenic and settler colonial inheritances. This scholarship, which is published in journals including Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Children’s Geographies and Environmental Humanities, is rooted in perspectives from Indigenous knowledges, Black feminist geographies, and posthumanist theories. Drawing from her experience as a pedagogical facilitator in early learning settings, Fikile is also interested in participatory and action-oriented approaches for supporting in-service early childhood educators in engaging social and environmental justice oriented pedagogies. She can be reached at fnxumalo@austin.utexas.edu

Jaye Johnson Thiel

Jaye Johnson Thiel is a Visiting Research Scholar at the University of Georgia where she serves as the Research and Activities Co-Director of a community place-based research center. As a qualitative methodologist and interdisciplinary researcher, her scholarship explores the co-constructive entanglements of human and more-than-human bodies, and their mutually constitutive roles in producing childhood, literacies, and place. Specifically, she considers how the material and discursive entangle to create unique opportunities for intellectual and embodied fullness during creative play and how these moments serve as counter narratives to deficit discourses surrounding women, children, families, and teachers. She can be contacted at: jathiel@pobox.com

Zsuzsa Millei

Zsuzsa Millei is a Postdoctoral Researcher with the Space and Political Agency Research Group (SPARG) at the University of Tampere, Finland (2015-2016), and Senior Lecturer at the School of Education, The University of Newcastle, Australia. Her interdisciplinary research understands early education and care as a political practice and explores: 1) how childhood is instrumentalised and governed by international and national policies and curricula; 2) how children participate in learning and caring relations and communities; and 3) how children¹s political subjectivities emerge in different political contexts and among heterogeneous human and nonhuman actors. Her research is driven by a desire to pre/reconfigure the world as co-presence, emergence, relationships and stories that make the place our place with children. She can be contacted at: zsuzsanna.millei@newcastle.edu.au

Cristina D. Vintimilla

Cristina D. Vintimilla teaches at Capilano University and is a pedagogista at Capilano University Children’s Centre. Her doctoral work addressed the ethical question of living well with others within pedagogical contexts and its relation with teacher subjectivity. Her current research as a pedagogista furthers and intensifies this focus by exploring with children and educators multiple conceptualizations about living with others, particularly when the Other is a more than human Other. Drawing from post-structuralist, environmental humanities and feminist theorizations, Cristina is interested in explorations that can provoke and advance thought about subject formation, place and inventive responsibility in times of overdetermined crises. She can be contact at: mdelgado@capilanou.ca

Nicole Land

Nicole Land is a research associate with the Collective, and a pedagogical facilitator and instructor at the University of Victoria. Combining her academic background in kinesiology with her current research practice in early childhood education, Nicole is interested in thinking with children’s entangled, complex, and contested material relations with fat, obesity, motion, and corporeality in our common worlds. She experiments with a multiplicity of possibilities for inhabiting-with bodies and viscerality as they move, connect and matter amid messy colonized and more-than-human spaces. Nicole can be contacted at nland@uvic.ca.

Teresa Dixon

Teresa Dixon is an early childhood educator at the University of Victoria Child Care Services. Teresa is interested in how children relate to sound and place. She is examining how certain sounds define specific moments and places. Teresa can be reached at Dixon.teresa@gmail.com

Susanne Gannon

Susanne Gannon is equity program leader in the Centre for Educational Research at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. She draws on theories of place, bodies, affects and new materialities in order to better understand how particular ways of being are enabled or closed down for young people and the more than human inhabitants of our common worlds. She is interested in all sorts of materialities and representations, including and exceeding the ‘real’ accounts of lived experience that are privileged in much empirical research. The common worlds that shape her thinking and being include the sandstone escarpments and forests of the Blue Mountains, and the rapidly growing urban areas of western Sydney. She can be contacted at: S.Gannon@uws.edu.au

Mary Caroline Rowan

Mary Caroline Rowan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Education at Concordia University, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. She recently defended her PhD titled, “Thinking with Nunangat in Proposing Pedagogies for/with Inuit Early Childhood Education”, at the University of New Brunswick, where she was a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholar. She has worked as a visting scholar at the University of Canterbury in Aotearoa/New Zealand and at the Sami Allaskuvla in the Norwegian part of Saapmi. Her research interests include documenting encounters with land, water and ice as a strategy for accessing Indigenous ontologies in the practice of early childhood education. She can be contacted at: carol.rowan@unb.ca

Ildikó Danis

Ildikó Danis is an early childhood educator at University of Victoria Child Care Services. She has a degree in early childhood education from Georgia State University, US and has worked in the field in Canada, US and Hungary. Her interest in common worlds pedagogies spurred her curiosity about children's relations with place. She is currently focussing on how storytelling might help to connect with other species, with the material world and with place. She can be contacted at: idanis12@uvic.ca

Tonya Rooney

Tonya Rooney is a lecturer in Early Childhood Education at the Australian Catholic University .Building on her doctoral research in philosophy and childhood studies, Tonya's research focuses on children's spaces, in particular on how different forms of regulation and control play out in these spaces and impact on children's encounters and relations with the world around them. The context for this research is the changing nature of contemporary childhood experience, including the merging physical/virtual worlds of childhood and the local/global tensions that characterise the places children inhabit. Tonya can be contacted at tonya.rooney@acu.edu.au

Margaret Somerville

Margaret Somerville is Professor of Education and Director of the Centre for Educational Research, University of Western Sydney. She is interested in creative and alternative methodologies for researching sustainability education from early childhood to schools and community education. Drawing on a long history of collaborative research with Australian Aboriginal communities about their relationship to place, she is interested in epistemological frameworks that address the nature culture binary for planetary sustainability. Margaret can be contact at: Margaret.Somerville@uws.edu.au

Sylvia Kind

Sylvia Kind is a faculty instructor in early childhood education at Capilano University and an atelierista at the Capilano University Children’s Centre. Her research and teaching interests are in teacher inquiry, studio research, the role of materials in early childhood education, and atelierista studies. She has spent the past 6 years developing studio spaces and experimenting with the idea of art as research in early childhood settings. She is currently engaged in an arts-based collaborative inquiry into the role materials play in early childhood education. She can be contacted at: skind@capilanou.ca

Jenny Ritchie

Jenny Ritchie has a background as a child-care educator and kindergarten teacher, followed by 25 years experience in early childhood teacher education. She lectures at Victoria University of Wellington , New Zealand. Her teaching, research, and writing has focused on supporting early childhood educators and teacher educators to enhance their praxis in terms of cultural, environmental and social justice issues. She is currently interested in the ways that, through connections with members of local Indigenous communities, we might gain understandings that can inform our collective responses to the climate crisis. She can be contacted at: jenny.ritchie@vuw.ac.nz

Emily Ashton

Emily Ashton is pursuing a Doctoral degree in Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria. She is interested in how child-figures, figurations of childhood, and early childhood imaginaries entangle to create particular worlds. Her current research seeks out figures that have the potential to challenge taken for granted orthodoxies, oppose settler colonialism, and gesture towards different futures. She is a graduate of the Critical Studies in Education Master’s program at the University of New Brunswick where she worked with the Early Childhood Centre to develop and implement the province’s first early years’ framework. She can be contacted at eashton@uvic.ca.

Susana Cortés-Morales

Susana Cortés-Morales is a social anthropologist and doctoral researcher at the School of Education, University of Leeds. In the past she has conducted research in Chile on young children’s everyday mobility and spatiality. Currently she is conducting her doctoral research with young children in a small town in the United Kingdom. In this study she explores how children relate to manifold places at diverse scales through their own physical movements but also through the movements of other human and non human actors with whom they interact: family, friends, institutional staff, toys, animals, technological devices and the media. She can be contacted at: edsrcm@leeds.ac.uk

Teena Piccini

Teena Piccini is an Early Childhood Educator/ researcher, currently completing her Masters Degree at the Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Interested in the intersections between Early Childhood Education for Sustainability and decolonisation, Teena is exploring the transformative opportunities of common world pedagogy in urban, Australian, long day care settings. Teena can be contacted at teenapiccini@gmail.com

Kathleen Kummen

Kathleen Kummen is an instructor in and the coordinator of the School of Education and Childhood Studies at Capilano University. Her current work with student early childhood educators is inspired by insights from postfoundational theory, feminist theory and Indigenous studies. Her research interests explore the implications for pedagogy when learning is no longer understood as an event that occurs within the individual through encounters with other humans. She is exploring how we might attend to how things, both organic and inorganic, act on our understandings of the world. She can be contacted atkkummen@capilanou.ca

Pauliina Rautio

Pauliina Rautio is an adjunct professor and a postdoctoral researcher in the Faculty of Education at the University of Oulu in Finland. Her research interests have evolved from everyday life aesthetics in the lives of rural northeners in Finland, to everyday life child-matter engagements. Her specific interest lies in exploring children’s relations with their nonhuman surroundings, animals in specific, as post-anthropocentric processes of de-individualisation. She is currently working with a group of children, sand, pretend dogs, beetles, go pro cameras, a pine tree and two mountain-ashes in an early childhood education setting in the North of Finland. She can be contacted at: pauliina.rautio@oulu.fi

Alexis Peirce Caudell

Alexis is pursuing a Doctoral degree in Informatics at Indiana University, USA. As part of the Computing, Culture, & Society group her research looks at the daily inter and intra relationships between children, technology, and the environment using ethnographic methods. This work draws upon the fields of environmental history and anthropology, the history of technology, science and technology studies (STS), childhood studies, children’s geographies, and social informatics. In the classroom Alexis teaches information and computer ethics, research design, and social informatics. Alexis’ educational background includes instructional technology, library and information science, and geography. She can be contacted at abpeirce@indiana.edu

Nikki Rotas

Nikki Rotas is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Elementary Education at the University of Alberta. Her research intersects environmental science and arts-based education. Nikki is interested in ecology, embodiment, and theories of movement and affect in relation to educational research. She is also developing innovative methodologies with the use of wearable technologies in urban schools. She can be contacted at: rotas@ualberta.ca

Emily Coon

Emily Coon is Kanien'keha:ka from Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory in Ontario. She is currently a Master's student in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria. As a traditional singer and drum carrier, Emily is interested in bringing Drum into the places she shares with young children. Her work aims to explore the possibilities that arise when children are in relation with Drum, such as the interruption of colonial (re)productions in early childhood education. Emily also strives to bring attention to erased Indigenous land relations and silenced ontologies that exist in our (un)common worlds. Emily can be contacted at eccoon@uvic.ca

Marek Tesar

Marek Tesar is a lecturer in childhood studies and early childhood education at the University of Auckland, focusing on philosophy, history, and sociology of childhood. His research is concerned with children’s relations with place and space, and notions of urban childhoods. Marek is currently leading a childhood studies research project, using philosophy as a method and working with and alongside early childhood settings in urban Auckland, that investigates childhood subjectivities and relationships with urban places and spaces. In this research, young children’s relationships with human and non-human subjects/objects take an active role in policy making in local settings. Marek can be contacted at: m.tesar@auckland.ac.nz

Julia Wilson

Julia Wilson is an early childhood educator at the University of Victoria Child Care Services. In addition to her early childhood education diploma, she has a degree in psychology/sociology from the University of Victoria. Her curiosity in the interdisciplinary field of Human-Animal Studies has been her inspiration and driving force in fostering empathy and caring towards all species. She can be contacted at: centre4@uvic.ca

Susannah Clement

Susannah Clement is a PhD Candidate from the Department of Geography and Sustainable Communities, University of Wollongong. Her research looks at the experience and relationship between family members when walking in urban space, specifically what happens when adults and children walk together. Her PhD aims to question what it means for families to walk in car-dependent society and how this in turn shows what it means to be a family through walking. Trained in cultural geography, Susannah’s work is informed by feminist theory and aims to uncover the emotional, affective and visceral side of walking, which so is often ignored in the planning of public spaces. She can be contacted at: sc527@uowmail.edu.au

Nina Odegard

Nina Odegard is working on her Ph.D at University College of Applied Science Oslo and Akershus. She is a preschool teacher and a pedagogista, and started two creative recycling centers. Her doctoral project, entitled 'Aesthetic exploration with recycled materials - in the light of materiality', uses posthuman and new materialism theories. She is also engaged in several environmental ecological projects that challenge anthropocentrism in order to imagine a more sustainable future. She can be contacted at: nina.odegard@hioa.no

Kim Atkinson

Kim Atkinson is an early childhood educator and pedagogical facilitator for the Unit for Early Years Research and Development at the University of Victoria. In her work with educators and children, she is interested in thinking with a common worlds framework to consider the entanglements and co-shapings inherent in daily encounters with place, materials, plants and animals. She can be reached at klatkins@uvic.ca

Deanna Elliott

Deanna Elliott is an educator at the University of Victoria Child Care Services. Her 16 years experience working with toddlers has strengthened her interest in materials and outdoor play spaces. She is curious about how relationships with place transform over time for educators, children and the more-than-human others. She is currently exploring how storying and music might connect children to place. Deanna can be contacted at: dinnie@uvic.ca

Angie Simpson

Angie Simpson is an early childhood educator at the University of Victoria Childcare Services . She is also a graduate of The School of Toronto Dance Theatre with 30 years ballet and contemporary dance training. As a dance educator of young children, she is always searching for new ways of thinking, learning and reflecting on embodiment. Angie is currently exploring place through Site Specific Dance. Her objectives are to encourage dance knowledge, dance appreciation and dance curiosity in relation to place and space. She can be contacted at: centre5@uvic.ca

Iris Duhn

Iris Duhn is a Senior Lecturer in early childhood education at Monash University. She has a longstanding interest in education for sustainability and the politics of childhood. Her academic background draws on feminist theories, governmentality studies and the sociology of childhood to explore how to share planetary liveliness in all its forms with respect and care. Her current research interests focus on places, specifically childhoods in urbannatures, and the contingent multispecies and vibrant matter alliances that entangle species, things and forces in cities. She can be contacted at: iris.duhn@monash.edu

Karin Murris

Karin Murris is Full Professor of Pedagogy and Philosophy at the School of Education at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Grounded in philosophy as an academic discipline, her main research interests are in posthuman intra-active pedagogies such as Philosophy with children and Reggio Emilia, school ethics and postqualitative research methods. She is Principal investigator of the Decolonising Early Childhood Discourses: Critical Posthumanism in Higher Education research project funded by the South African National Research Foundation (NRF). Her articles can be downloaded from https://uct.academia.edu/KarinMurris

Aideen Deschutter

Aideen Deschutter is an early childhood educator at the University of Victoria Child Care Services in British Columbia, Canada. As a participant in the Common World Childhoods Research Collective’s projects, she is interested in children's relationships to species, materials and place. Aideen sees herself as a “being/particle” on a journey through time and space. Along the way she’s making connections to environments, questioning existence and being present in this ever-changing place. Aideen is hopeful that the children under her care will positively benefit from these experiences. She can be contacted at: centre5@uvic.ca

Jeanne Marie Iorio

Jeanne Marie Iorio is a senior lecturer in early childhood education at Victoria University. Her rethinking child-adult conversations as aesthetic experience represent how she intertwines her background in the arts and early childhood education. Her interdisciplinary research includes arts-based methodologies, exploring power differences between children and adults, and building sustainable communities within and beyond early childhood. She is interested in how common world pedagogies frame how place transforms the thoughts, actions, and questions of young children as they build a deep and beloved relationship with place. She can be contacted at: jeanne.iorio@vu.edu.au

Scott Kouri

Scott Kouri is a doctoral student in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria, Lekwungen territory. He practices as a clinical counsellor, sessional undergraduate instructor, and youth worker. With a background in outdoor based learning, Scott is rethinking and attempting to politicize the role of place in teaching and practitioner training, particularly in the settler colonial contexts of Canada. His research interests currently focus on settler subjectivity, schizoanalysis, solidarity, and politicized praxis. He can be contacted at: scott.kouri@gmail.com

Laurie Kocher

Laurie Kocher is a faculty member of Early Childhood Care and Education department at Capilano University in North Vancouver, Canada. She navigates between the worlds of academia and practice, always with a desire to bring the two together, and cares deeply about being with children in outdoor spaces. Her academic background includes doctoral work focused on the pedagogical project of Reggio Emilia, with particular interest in narrative and visual practices of documentation. Laurie’s recent research work was related to exploring materiality with children and educators: http://encounterswithmaterials.com She also co-edits, together with Veronica Pacini-Ketchaw, the journal Canadian Children. Laurie’s home borders the unceded territories of the Tsleil Waututh (“People of the Inlet”) First Nation, near Vancouver, Canada. It is a beautiful place where mountains meet the sea and the ocean sings her name. Laurie can be reached at: lkocher@telus.net

Sherri-Lynn Yazbeck

Sherri-Lynn Yazbeck is an early childhood educator at the University of Victoria Child Care Services. Her academic background in psychology, philosophy, and early childhood education are combined with fourteen years of practice as an early childhood educator. Inspired by 'ordinary moments' with children, she is interested in the entangled multi-species relationships and encounters that take place in the classroom, playground, nearby forests, and gardens. She is intrigued by how these human and more than human assemblages create place and pedagogy in early education. She is also researching what it might mean to practice care and sustainability through these children-more than human relationships. She can be contacted at: syazbeck@uvic.ca

Johanna Payjack

Johanna Payjack is an early childhood educator working at University of Victoria's Child Care Centres. Over the past 13 years in the ECE field, she has been reflecting on the role of materials and environments. She is currently exploring the transformation of materials in collaboration with young children. Johanna can be contacted at: centre5@uvic.ca

B. Denise Hodgins

Denise Hodgins teaches in the School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria, is a research associate with the Investigating Quality Project, and the principal investigator and pedagogical facilitator at University of Victoria Child Care Services. Her work is rooted in feminist, poststructural, and posthumanist theoretical perspectives, and reflects a commitment to making visible and engaging with issues of equity in, through, and for pedagogy and research practices. The projects she is involved in push for complex conceptualizations of child/more-than-human relations, as well as explorations and imaginings of how we might respond with care, as both a vital material doing and an ethico-political obligation, to the material, colonial, and environmental legacies that children inherit. She can be contacted at: dhodgins@uvic.ca

Vanessa Clark

Vanessa Clark is a PhD student in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria on Lekwungen territory and a non-regular faculty member in the School of Education and Childhood Studies at Capilano University on the territories of the Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. She is also a practicing artist and working on her certificate at Emily Carr University. Her doctoral research focuses on early childhood place-specific art practices hat foreground ethical engagements with settler colonialism in Canada. Vanessa can be contacted at vanessa.vondruska@gmail.com

Karen Malone

Karen Malone is a professor of education and sustainability research leader in the Centre for Educational Research, University of Western Sydney. Her background is in environmental studies, geography and childhood sociology. Her research is primarily located in slums and challenging communities in majority world nations where she focuses on children’s encounters with the human and more-than-human world. She supports children researching child-animal-earth relations with placed based participatory research using drawing, photography, stories and walking tours. She utilises posthumanist and new materialist theoretical approaches in order to challenge anthropocentricism in the new nature movement. In recent publications she has been exploring how disorderly and diverse child/nature/body/place relations could be central to reimagining a sustainable future. She can be contacted at: k.malonr@uws.edu.au

Sandrina de Finney

Sandrina de Finney is an associate professor in the School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria, located on unceded Lekwungen and W̱SÁNEĆ lands. As a researcher with the Siem Smun’eem Indigenous Child Well-being Research Network, she focuses on recentering customary caretaking laws for Indigenous children who are displaced from their traditional territories. This work foregrounds the resurgence of Indigenous community-land relations and ethics. As part of the Common Worlds collective, Sandrina is particularly interested in exploring multispecies and more-than-human conceptualizations in light of the continued dehumanization of Indigenous peoples under neocolonial settler state regimes. She can be contacted at sdefinn@uvic.ca

Catherine Hamm

Catherine Hamm is an early career researcher at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. Her doctoral study investigated the connections between teacher identity and curriculum practices in early childhood. Catherine has a strong commitment to social justice and is interested in exploring the ways in which localized, specific Aboriginal knowledges can inform reconciliation pedagogies in early childhood education. Catherine’s current work involves investigating children’s relations with place, exploring the ways in which children might engage with the plants and animals that constitute the local places that children inhabit in post- colonial Australia. She can be contacted at: Catherine.Hamm@vu.edu.au

Prasanna Srinivasan

Prasanna Srinivasan is a lecturer in early childhood at Monash University. She has sustained interest in critical cultural studies, particularly in postcolonial spaces. In her research and teaching, she engages with postcolonial, Critical Race and Feminist poststructural theories to unmask one’s subjective ideological partialities towards nation and national identity. Her current research interest focuses on inquiring the juxtaposition of nationalism and multiculturalism in postcolonial spaces, and specifically in educational settings. She specifically grapples with the in between “hybrid” space, for, with and as postcolonial subjects, by entangling the interactions of ‘self’ and ‘other’. Prasanna can be contacted at: prasanna.srini@monash.edu

Peter Kraftl

Peter Kraftl is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Birmingham, in the United Kingdom. He has research interests in three overlapping areas: children's geographies; geographies of education; architecture. For the past decade - often in collaboration with John Horton, from The University of Northampton - his research has focussed on the more-than-representational aspects of children's lives. His work draws on a range of theories of materiality, embodiment, emotion and affect, and most recently he has sought to question notions of voice and agency in childhood studies. Since 2003, he has undertaken a programme of research at alternative education spaces in the UK, seeking to understand how the representational and more-than-representational, emotional and affective, and human and more-than-human combine in efforts to imagine and do childhoods differently from a perceived mainstream. Peter can be contacted at p.kraftl@bham.ac.uk

Michael W. Derby

Michael W. Derby is a teacher, an educational researcher at the Maple Ridge Environmental School Project, and occasionally a poet. He completed an MA at Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, BC) in 2012 and is presently working on his doctoral degree. He is a member of the Imaginative Education Research Group, The Coralroot Collective and assistant director of Imaginative Ecological Education. He recently published his first book titled: Place, Being, Resonance: An Ecohermeneutic Approach to Education. His research seeks to dance with ecocritical, ecopoetic, anarcha-indigenous, existential and place-based pedagogies that imaginatively engage students and inspire caring relationships with the more-than-human world. He also likes long walks in the forest and mushrooms. Questions, comments, insults, donations: mderby@sfu.ca

Narda Nelson

Narda Nelson is a master’s student in the School of and Youth Care, University of Victoria, located on Lekwungen-speaking traditional territories (Victoria, BC Canada). Drawing on her background in Women’s (Gender) Studies, Narda’s interdisciplinary, early childhood research is informed by feminist theory, the environmental humanities, Indigenous perspectives, and cultural geography to rethink young children’s relations with animals, plants, and landscape forms. Narda works as a pedagogista with UVic Child Care Services, with particular interest in the way processes of rot (compost), death, and waste-flows open up possibilities for promoting ethical futures with plants and animals we share space with. She can be contacted at: nelsonn@uvic.ca

Teresa Lloro-Bidart

Teresa Lloro-Bidart is an Assistant Professor in the Liberal Studies Department at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. In her research, she draws on feminist posthumanist theories and urban political ecology lenses to study human-animal relationships in informal learning spaces like aquariums and gardens. Teresa's current project examines how community gardens might challenge historical conceptualizations of urban landscapes that posit them as devoid of and not for “nature,” especially common urban animals. Further, she explores how service-learning in these sites can be deployed as a pedagogical tool to encourage her undergraduate students (many of whom are pursuing teaching at the early childhood or primary level) to grapple with their own sense of socioecological responsibility. She can be contacted at tllor001@ucr.edu

Kate Cairns

Kate Cairns is Assistant Professor of Childhood Studies at Rutgers University-Camden. Her work draws upon feminist, interdisciplinary perspectives to explore how children and youth are constructed as the promise or threat of collective futures. She has investigated this dynamic across multiple realms, including rural schooling, maternal foodwork, and urban agriculture. Throughout her research, issues of subjectivity and inequality intertwine with questions of place. She is currently researching efforts to connect children to their food, and teaching courses in children’s geographies, gender and education, and girlhood studies. She can be contacted at: kate.cairns@rutgers.edu

Connie Russell

Connie Russell is a Professor in the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Canada where she teaches courses in interspecies education, environmental and sustainability education, and social justice education. She edited the Canadian Journal of Environmental Education for 12 years (2004-2016) and co-edits the Peter Lang book series, Rethinking Environmental Education. She has been writing about the pedagogical pitfalls and possibilities of various human/animal and human/more-than-human relationships for over 20 years. Her most recent work has focused on the intersection of speciesim, sexism, and sizeism and the ways in which fat pedagogy could enrich environmental, interspecies, and social justice education. The overall intent of her research, teaching, and work as an administrator has been to help create conditions for all humans, all life, and the land to flourish. She can be contacted at crussell@lakeheadu.ca

Farveh Ghafouri

Farveh Ghafouri is a teacher educator at the School of Early Childhood Education, Seneca College. In her teaching and research, she is interested in the complex relationship between young children and nature in urban settings. In her post-secondary teaching, with her students, she is examining and reflecting on the human desires to respond to nature and to be belonged, regardless of the circumstances. She is also blogging on children’s everyday experiences with nature and the senses that they are making of them. She can be contacted at farveh.ghafouri@senecacollege.ca

Randa Khattar

Randa Khattar researches and teaches in early years andragogical contexts. Her research is anchored within a constellation of post-foundational, complexity, and eco-feminist theories, and uses creative paradigms to problematize educators’ ethico-ontological and epistemological stances within contested developmental and managerial early childhood discourses. She explores experimental pedagogies and how spaces of exploration and encounters with living, breathing environments might transform educator and children’s relationships at a time of acute climate change. She is curious about the multiple ways we can co-exist in a more-than-human world. She can be reached at rkhatta@uwo.ca

Andrea Delaune

Andrea Delaune is a teacher and researcher in Aotearoa New Zealand. Andrea is currently engaged in Doctoral research investigating ethical engagement by children and teachers within the more-than-human world. As a part of a larger consideration of the ethics of early childhood teaching, this research will seek to reevaluate the value of moral concepts which promote an anthropocentric view of engagement within early childhood education. Andrea is researching children's understandings of their entanglements within the common world and promoting teacher practices which forefront these ethical concerns. Andrea can be contacted at andrea.delaune@pg.canterbury.ac.nz

Amy Cutter-Mackenzie

Amy Cutter-Mackenzie is a Professor of Sustainability, Environment and Education at Southern Cross University, School of Education, Australia. She is the Deputy Head of School Research & HDR Training for the School of Education, as well as the Research Leader of the ‘Sustainability, Environment and Education’ (SEE) Research Cluster. Amy’s research is deeply engaged with ontologies in/as nature through socioecological and posthumanist theoretical orientations. She supports educators and children in researching ChildhoodNature applying child-framed arts-based research methodologies. In recent research she focuses on understanding young children’s nature play in early childhood education. She is also actively works with children and young people in representing their climate change voices in the anthropocene. Amy can be contacted at: acutterm@scu.edu.au.

Nancy van Groll

Nancy van Groll is a Master’s student at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada in the Early Childhood Education program. Her research interests include place conscious education, social and emotional well being and exploring issues of inclusion, ecojustice and sustainability in early learning settings. She is curious about how children’s relationships with place and the more-than-human world can cultivate their social and emotional well-being and connectedness. She can be contacted at nancy.vangroll@ryerson.ca

Welcome to the Common Worlds Research Collective. Please hover over images and click on the eye icon to learn more about the members.

 

Affrica Taylor

Affrica Taylor

Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw

Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw

Mindy Blaise

Mindy Blaise

Michelle Elmitt

Michelle Elmitt

Kelly Boucher

Kelly Boucher

Kumara Ward

Kumara Ward

Fikile Nxumalo

Fikile Nxumalo

Jaye Johnson Thiel

Jaye Johnson Thiel

Zsuzsa Millei

Zsuzsa Millei

Cristina D. Vintimilla

Cristina D. Vintimilla

Nicole Land

Nicole Land

Teresa Dixon

Teresa Dixon

Susanne Gannon

Susanne Gannon

Mary Caroline Rowan

Mary Caroline Rowan

Ildikó Danis

Ildikó Danis

Tonya Rooney

Tonya Rooney

Margaret Somerville

Margaret Somerville

Sylvia Kind

Sylvia Kind

Jenny Ritchie

Jenny Ritchie

Emily Ashton

Emily Ashton

Susana Cortés-Morales

Susana Cortés-Morales

Teena Piccini

Teena Piccini

Kathleen Kummen

Kathleen Kummen

Pauliina Rautio

Pauliina Rautio

Alexis Peirce Caudell

Alexis Peirce Caudell

Nikki Rotas

Nikki Rotas

Emily Coon

Emily Coon

Marek Tesar

Marek Tesar

Julia Wilson

Julia Wilson

Susannah Clement

Susannah Clement

Nina Odegard

Nina Odegard

Kim Atkinson

Kim Atkinson

Deanna Elliott

Deanna Elliott

Angie Simpson

Angie Simpson

Iris Duhn

Iris Duhn

Karin Murris

Karin Murris

Aideen Deschutter

Aideen Deschutter

Jeanne Marie Iorio

Jeanne Marie Iorio

Scott Kouri

Scott Kouri

Laurie Kocher

Laurie Kocher

Sherri-Lynn Yazbeck

Sherri-Lynn Yazbeck

Johanna Payjack

Johanna Payjack

B. Denise Hodgins

B. Denise Hodgins

Vanessa Clark

Vanessa Clark

Karen Malone

Karen Malone

Sandrina de Finney

Sandrina de Finney

Catherine Hamm

Catherine Hamm

Prasanna Srinivasan

Prasanna Srinivasan

Peter Kraftl

Peter Kraftl

Michael W. Derby

Michael W. Derby

Narda Nelson

Narda Nelson

Teresa Lloro-Bidart

Teresa Lloro-Bidart

Kate Cairns

Kate Cairns

Connie Russell

Connie Russell

Farveh Ghafouri

Farveh Ghafouri

Randa Khattar

Randa Khattar

Andrea Delaune

Andrea Delaune

Amy Cutter-Mackenzie

Amy Cutter-Mackenzie

Nancy van Groll

Nancy van Groll

Shil Bae

Shil Bae is a kindergarten teacher, and a postgraduate researcher at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Her earlier works focus on the implications of the early childhood education policy on teachers and families in New Zealand. Drawing from feminist materialism, environmental humanities and indigenous studies, she is currently working on the project which explores the relationships between children, teachers and more-than-human species, and how these relations help us to learn with/from each other for more ethical and sustainable living. She can be contacted at: shil.bae@pg.canterbury.ac.nz

Kate Waterworth

Kate Waterworth works at AUT University in Auckland, New Zealand. She is interested in rethinking disability and childhood using posthuman, postqualitative and new materialist approaches, with a hope to explore new possibilities for living well collectively in our common world. She can be contacted at kate.waterworth@aut.ac.nz

Amy Mulvenna

A child person, a book person, and a make-a-mess person, Amy is also a PhD Candidate in the School of Environment, Education and Development (Human Geography). Her project, titled: ‘Playing with Place: towards creative mapping praxis in post-conflict Belfast’, focuses on those less obvious, less overt, affective, everyday geographies of children living in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and draws into this arena their encounters and intra-actions with more-than-human things, as facilitated through more-than-representational mappings. In the co-design of four ‘creative cuts’, Amy seeks to upend and extend existing research methodologies and ways of ‘framing’ childhood in Belfast today, opening up novel spaces and ways for participants to explore and express their perceptions of and perspectives on what matters to them in their city. She further seeks to interrogate and reposition normative geographies of division as have been traditionally framed and mapped in the context of Belfast. Amy can be contacted at amy.mulvenna@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk and is currently also postgraduate liaison officer for the GCYFRG https://gcyfrg.wordpress.com/

Teresa Elkin Postila

Teresa Elkin Postila is a doctoral student in Early Childhood Education at the Department of Child and Youth Studies at Stockholm University in Sweden. She started her doctoral studies in March 2016. Prior to this, she worked in Preschools and Schools with different assignments, for example as Preschool developer. She has academic background in Geoscience and Education, in which she holds Masters-degrees. In her doctoral thesis Preschoolers as co-researchers in research addressing environmental issues, she combines and put her different academicals backgrounds in work in collaboration with Preschoolers as co-researchers, amongst others. Key words in her forthcoming thesis are New Materialism, Methodology, Environmental Issues and Water. She can be contacted at teresa.elkin.postila@buv.su.se.

Miriam Potts

Miriam is an artist/researcher based in Gippsland, Victoria and a doctoral candidate at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. Currently Miriam is experimenting with feminist new materialist research methodologies to help her investigate entangled relations between humans and more-than-humans in local places. miriam.potts@live.vu.edu.au

Alex Berry

Alex is a PhD student with Western University’s Faculty of Education on the lands of the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee, and Leni-Lunaape peoples. Alex is interested in post foundational studies of affect, place and materiality in environmental education and the possibilities that arts-based pedagogies bring in thinking with these concepts. Most recently, Alex’s work is focused on cultivating new methodologies that attune to the sensorialities of human/waste relations. In her doctoral research, she will collaborate with children and educators at a shanti-school in India in reimagining local waste materials by performing with Artistic Memoir as a post qualitative research method. She can be contacted at aberry28@uwo.ca

Alicia Flynn

Alicia Flynn is a PhD candidate at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education (University of Melbourne). Her interdisciplinary research with a secondary school in inner urban Naarm/Melbourne, explores how the daily practices of regularly walking to the local creek and the materiality of learning in entangled, multispecies, more-than-human, settler colonial-contested places is slowly weaving a site-specific ecopedagogy and a commitment to ecojustice over time. She teaches across primary, secondary, community and tertiary contexts. Alicia lives, works and learns on Wurundjeri land in the Kulin Nation. She has as much fun turning hot compost piles with 7-year-olds as she does engaging in juicy conversations about place pedagogies, multispecies entanglements and the daily practices that might just fashion flourishing common worlds.

Kelsey Wapenaar

Kelsey is an early childhood educator at the University of Victoria Child Care Services. Her degree is in Early Childhood Education from Capilano University with a focus on atelierista studies. She is interested in the role materials play in childhood. As well as the ongoing entanglements of inter-species relations that happen in the classroom, forest and garden. She can be reached at, kelseywapenaar@uvic.ca

Anna Palmer

Anna Palmer is an associate Professor in Early Childhood Education at the Department of Child and Youth Studies, Stockholm University in Sweden where she is currently Director of Section for Early Childhood Education. Anna’s current research interests focus on material feminist studies and methodology in relation to Early Childhood Education. Her work looks closely at alternative ways of learning, doing and understanding mathematics in aesthetic learning practices. In a recent publication she draws on the work of Gilles Deleuze to understand how scientific concepts interact with children’s bodies and other material entities partaking in a learning event. Another research interest concerns different ways of understanding ethics in preschool, drawing on new materialist philosophy. She can be contacted at anna.palmer@buv.su.se.

Philipp Klaus

Philipp Klaus is ‘on the side of the child’, promoting children’s rights, democratic education and the need for an ethics of caring. His childhood involved numerous moves to different countries on various continents left him with a concept of ‘home’ that encompasses the entire world and requires no more than a pillow: a true Third Culture Kid. Philipp studied and began teaching primary school in London; climbed a few trees; gained an MEd in Politics, Development and Democratic Education from Cambridge; built a few forts; and worked at Summerhill School for five years as a teacher and houseparent. Summerhill has had a profound impact on him as an educator and person. He co-founded play:groundNYC, an adventure playground. He currently teaches primary school at River House Academy in Goa. He is interested in collaborating on research into space, affect and ethics in regard to children and the spaces they inhabit. A chapter on this topic, titled ‘an ordinary day’, has been published in the Palgrave International Handbook of Alternative Education.

Kassahun Weldemariam

Kassahun Weldemariam is a PhD candidate at the Department of Pedagogical, Curricular and Professional Studies at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. He holds an international masters in Early Childhood Education and Care; and another masters degree in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). Kassahun worked as a teacher trainer for four years at Dilla University in Ethiopia and as a preschool pedagogical leader for three years in Stockholm, Sweden. His PhD project is based on a critical view on the anthropocentric/human-centric and environmentalist approach to sustainability within early childhood, and attempts to embrace the more-than-human actors towards an alternative approach to addressing sustainability challenges. He can be contacted at:Kassahun.weldemariam@gu.se.

Joshua Russell

I am an Assistant Professor at Canisius College in the Department of Animal Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation and the Anthrozoology Master’s program. My phenomenological research explores children’s lived relationships with various animals and other more-than-human beings. I am particularly interested in experiences of death, loss, and grief as central to childhood, development, identity, and learning and how such phenomena influence interspecies relations. My research interests include pedagogy and education as orientating endeavours, directing us toward various objects, relations, and values. I live in southern Ontario with my partner Sean and our rescue dog, Penny.

Burcu Meltem Arık

Burcu Meltem Arık is an environmental educator from Istanbul, Turkey. Her background is environmental and industrial chemistry. She is an MA student at Istanbul Bilgi University, where she is also a part-time instructor and runs ‘Biomimicry’ and ‘Ecological Literacy and Sustainability’ online elective courses. Her MA research focuses on late Ottoman period natural history narratives and practices, particularly at missionary schools. She is a birdwatcher since 1997, and entangling with birds have shaped her interest in non-human, more-than-human and multispecies worlds. Her 5-years old daughters’ name is Sumru (means tern), and during the weekends they run forest-bathing programs together for children and adults. She also works on displaced and migrant (mostly Syrian) children. She can be contacted at tulipasprengeri@gmail.com

Angela Molloy Murphy

Angela Molloy Murphy is a Doctoral student at Portland State University and a materials specialist with the Inventing ReMida Portland Project, the creative reuse center housed in Portland State University’s Helen Gordon Child Development Center. Her current research interests are in children’s narrative spaces as potential spaces of emergence, where materials, place, human, and non human beings all act as vibrant participants in world-making. Angela founded her own early childhood program, Rowanberry School, in 2006. Her research is grounded in a daily practice with children that is informed by experimental arts practices, new materialism, posthumanism, and the Reggio pedagogical and political theory of the hundred languages, exalting the value of pluralism and a 'dialogue between differences.' Angela can be reached at rowanberryschool@mac.com

Cory Jobb

Cory Jobb is an early childhood educator and a PhD student with the Faculty of Education at the University of Western Ontario. Cory is interested in thinking with pedagogies of place to explore how young children and educators make meaning of and negotiate with landscapes that disrupt the nature/culture divide. His proposed doctoral research draws on walking methodologies, children's geographies, and philosophy to explore the notion of place with young children and educators at a former municipal landfill in Southern Ontario, now known as the Glenridge Quarry Naturalization site. He can be contacted at cjobb@uwo.ca

Shil Bae

Shil Bae

Kate Waterworth

Kate Waterworth

Amy Mulvenna

Amy Mulvenna

Teresa Elkin Postila

Teresa Elkin Postila

Miriam Potts

Miriam Potts

Alex Berry

Alex Berry

Alicia Flynn

Alicia Flynn

Kelsey Wapenaar

Kelsey Wapenaar

Anna Palmer

Anna Palmer

Philipp Klaus

Philipp Klaus

Kassahun Weldemariam

Kassahun Weldemariam

Joshua Russell

Joshua Russell

Burcu Meltem Arık

Burcu Meltem Arık

Angela Molloy Murphy

Angela Molloy Murphy

Cory Jobb

Cory Jobb