Upcoming Common World Childhoods Presentations at AERA

Upcoming Common World Childhoods Presentations at AERA

A collection of presentations will be delivered at the upcoming American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting in Washington DC (April 2016) by members of the Common World Childhoods Research Collective

Reclaiming Common Worlds: Early Childhood Care and Education Settings as Sites of Civic/Environmental Action in Aotearoa (New Zealand)

Jenny Ritchie

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 23
    In Roundtable Session: Experimenting With Student Engagement, Responsibility, and Service to Place

Sat, April 9, 2:15 to 3:45pm, Convention Center, Level Two, Exhibit Hall D Section A

Abstract

Research such as that of Chawla (1999, 2007) signals the importance of early years’ experiences in generating dispositions of care and concern for the environment, an urgent ‘matter of concern’ (Latour, 2004) in the face of the current era of Anthropogenic climate crisis. This paper offers examples from recent research in Aotearoa (New Zealand) in early childhood education settings where teachers proactively offer pedagogies that foster such dispositions. Central to these pedagogies are the inclusion of local Indigenous knowledges (Ritchie, 2013), and the recognition that young children are capable of thoughtfully and collectively responding to environmental concerns (Adair, 2014).

COMMON WORLDING METHODS: ENACTING EMPIRICAL POSTQUALITATIVE EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH

Affrica Taylor, Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw & Mindy Blaise

Sat, April 9, 2:15 to 3:45pm, Marriott Marquis, Level Four, Independence Salon A

Session Type: Workshop

Abstract

This workshop will explore more-than-human ‘common worlding’ methods that put post-qualitative theories into practice. These methods move beyond traditional human-centric approaches to data collection and attend, instead, to the mutually-constituting relations within interconnected human and nonhuman ‘common worlds’. The workshop will begin with presenters introducing participants to common worlding methods such as tracing entangled multispecies relations, engaging with nonhumans as active research subjects, learning to being affected by the world, and thinking collectively in the presence of nonhuman others. These methods are drawn from their common world research in Canada, Hong Kong and Australia. Participants will then be invited to take part in series of activities, including discussions about the limits and possibilities of these methods

 

 

COMMON WORLD PEDAGOGIES FOR THE ANTHROPOCENE: A MORE-THAN-HUMAN TAKE ON ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION-AS-COLLECTIVE ACTION

Affrica Taylor, Fikile Nxumalo, Narda Nelson, Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw & Karen Malone.

Mon, April 11, 2:45 to 4:15pm, Marriott Marquis, Level Four, Independence Salon D

 

Session Type: Demonstration/Performance

Abstract

The imminent naming of the Anthropocene both reconfirms the urgent need for environmental education-as-activism and demands that we rethink our ways of doing it. We seize it as a moment to: (1) challenge the conceits of human exceptionalism that have led our species to fundamentally alter the earth’s ecological systems, (2) radically rethink our place and agency in the world,, and (3) try out new kinds of ‘common world’ pedagogies that enact a more-than-human form of recuperative collective action. Presenters will offer audio-visual demonstrations of their ‘common world’ pedagogies in Canada and Australia, where they work with young children to take recuperative collective action with the environment, rather than simply learning about it or acting on its behalf.

 

RESPONDING TO CURRENT TIMES OF ANTHROPOGENIC INHERITANCE: MULTISPECIES RELATIONS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Cristina Delgado, Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw, Carol Rowan, Fikile Nxumalo

Mon, April 11, 10:00 to 11:30am, Marriott Marquis, Level Four, Independence Salon B

Session Type: Symposium

Abstract

The session draws attention to the pedagogical and ethical implications of children’s situated multispecies relations within current colonial times of environmentally damaged places. Drawing from multispecies ethnographies on Inuit and Coast Salish territories in Canada, the papers highlight how attunement to the places children co-inhabit with more-than-human others might interrupt colonizing and extractive relations. Grounded in anti-colonial and environmental onto-epistemologies, the papers highlight pedagogies that stay with the trouble of colonial anthropogenic inheritances, while opening possibilities for children to learn to live in less destructive ways with more-than-human life.

 

COMMON WORLDING PEDAGOGIES: UNSETTLING EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM

Nicole Land, Narda Nelson, Fikile Nxumalo, Denise Hodgins, Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw, Carol Rowan, Affrica Taylor

Sat, April 9, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Marriott Marquis, Level Four, Liberty Salon N

Session Type: Symposium

Abstract

The purpose of this symposium is to share stories of/from common worlding pedagogies that work to unsettle the colonial sediments that continue to shape early childhood curriculum. By drawing attention to historical continuities and geographical dispersals with/in young children’s common worlds, the presenters challenge hegemonic Western developmental approaches to curriculum. They attend to soil biopolitics, geological subjectifications, multispecies undergrounds, and politics of refuse by offering compact, fractured, and entangled text-film-analysis-image provocations from four early childhood pedagogy research projects that unsettle colonial sediments. Following the four papers, the discussant will lead the panellists and symposium participants in a discussion about the ethico-political curricular eruptions that emerge from these common worlding pedagogies.

 

 

Entanglements Beyond and Inside the Young Child

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 37

Mon, April 11, 7:45 to 9:15am, Convention Center, Level Two, Exhibit Hall D Section B

Session Type: Roundtable Session

Abstract

This roundtable navigates intersections of entangled common worlds and more than human worlds: The presenters engage us in accounts of Inuit children’s relations with husky and town dogs; uncanny post-developmental encounters and provocations in an art exhibition; and infant experiences in “multi species publics.”

 

 

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